/page/2
In an article published in Gulf News, Business | Economy, Kevin Scott lists oversupply in the real estate sector as one of the key issues and challenges facing the local economy in 2012. 

For full article, click here.

In an article published in Gulf News, Business | Economy, Kevin Scott lists oversupply in the real estate sector as one of the key issues and challenges facing the local economy in 2012. 


For full article, click here.

#WhatIf this is an emitter of light? 

this is an emitter of light? 

"There are plans to unveil an online platform early next year called  Citypulse, for residents to learn about and contribute to urban planning  in the capital, said Fouad Kassem, the public affairs and media  relations manager for the UPC."
[Source: The National]

"There are plans to unveil an online platform early next year called Citypulse, for residents to learn about and contribute to urban planning in the capital, said Fouad Kassem, the public affairs and media relations manager for the UPC."

[Source: The National]

[source of fact: Jones Lang LaSalle, Dubai Real Estate Market Overview - Q2 2011]
Incubator, Dubai’s next move by Mishaal Al Gergawi for the Gulf News
“About 15 months ago, Jones Lang LaSalle published a report that    worryingly noted that 33 per cent of Dubai’s 43.6 million square feet of    commercial space was vacant, with an additional 40 million square  feet   (revised down from 60 million square feet) coming on to the  market by   2012.”

[source of fact: Jones Lang LaSalle, Dubai Real Estate Market Overview - Q2 2011]

Incubator, Dubai’s next move by Mishaal Al Gergawi for the Gulf News

“About 15 months ago, Jones Lang LaSalle published a report that worryingly noted that 33 per cent of Dubai’s 43.6 million square feet of commercial space was vacant, with an additional 40 million square feet (revised down from 60 million square feet) coming on to the market by 2012.”

It came across as a space  that could be appropriated for as big or as   small a group as it could  house. Spiritual, celebratory, collective.

It came across as a space that could be appropriated for as big or as small a group as it could house. Spiritual, celebratory, collective.

Making sense of dxbWRK
@jjabri @dxbWRK
you start noticing empty spaces in the city. as an architect you ask ‘why’? why so many empty spaces? the intrigue leads to investigation, and more so, to heightened interest in being in these empty spaces, the haven of a creative mind, a blank slate where possibilities are endless. we’ve been doing this for a couple of months: identifying empty spaces in the city of Dubai. and then we slowed down. do we grow a database of empty spaces? something is missing. again, i walk in Jumeira Beach Residences, in the Sadaf complex this time. the ratio of empty spaces is about 20-30% on the mezzanine commercial level. what if the spaces were not empty? is our aim to fill spaces? not at all. i’d say whether it was a 90 to 10% ratio of empty to occupied spaces or 100% occupied, the question would remain the same: are the occupied spaces maximizing on the community value proposition? is a community existing and flourishing as a result of the existence of these spaces? or are these spaces only contributing to the anonymity nurtured in those large scale, high speed, high turnover residential developments?  we started dxbWRK with a proposition that those empty spaces had the potential to open up to the community, for it to determine its own needs. this proposal works on the fringe of the issue. the issue is economics. how can our value proposition generate an viable economic model that would:     1. bring no financial losses to the real estate developer/space owner    2. bring social interest to the community residing in that development    3. bring no added expenses to the community residing in that development  and what if we came forward with a proposal that not only fulfills the above three criteria, but also acted on a fourth anchor:       4. devise financial benefit/return to the community residing in that development  this is what dxbWRK is about, that last point that makes design thinking merge with community building, and with financial viability and potential benefit to all stakeholders.  i will stop at that knowing that today was a revelation in a direction worth pursuing.

Making sense of dxbWRK

@jjabri @dxbWRK

you start noticing empty spaces in the city. as an architect you ask ‘why’? why so many empty spaces? the intrigue leads to investigation, and more so, to heightened interest in being in these empty spaces, the haven of a creative mind, a blank slate where possibilities are endless. we’ve been doing this for a couple of months: identifying empty spaces in the city of Dubai. and then we slowed down. do we grow a database of empty spaces? something is missing. again, i walk in Jumeira Beach Residences, in the Sadaf complex this time. the ratio of empty spaces is about 20-30% on the mezzanine commercial level. what if the spaces were not empty? is our aim to fill spaces? not at all. i’d say whether it was a 90 to 10% ratio of empty to occupied spaces or 100% occupied, the question would remain the same: are the occupied spaces maximizing on the community value proposition? is a community existing and flourishing as a result of the existence of these spaces? or are these spaces only contributing to the anonymity nurtured in those large scale, high speed, high turnover residential developments? we started dxbWRK with a proposition that those empty spaces had the potential to open up to the community, for it to determine its own needs. this proposal works on the fringe of the issue. the issue is economics. how can our value proposition generate an viable economic model that would: 1. bring no financial losses to the real estate developer/space owner 2. bring social interest to the community residing in that development 3. bring no added expenses to the community residing in that development and what if we came forward with a proposal that not only fulfills the above three criteria, but also acted on a fourth anchor: 4. devise financial benefit/return to the community residing in that development this is what dxbWRK is about, that last point that makes design thinking merge with community building, and with financial viability and potential benefit to all stakeholders. i will stop at that knowing that today was a revelation in a direction worth pursuing.

A Sequence of Questions: a Response
@sharmeensyed @dxbWRK
What is it that draws us to specific places? It’s a question that is either too obvious or far too vague to take on — in Dubai at least. There is a constant struggle to establish a relationship with our immediate environments, often intertwined with our sense [or lack] of ownership. Is it proximity? Is our sense of community based around the house, workplace, campus? Or is community associative; are we drawn to places that reflect our lifestyles, beliefs, memories and choices?
Here’s the big question: What if the two were the same? We want to investigate the possibility of spaces in geographical communities to reflect the associative programs of the various community members. Can there be a sufficient sense of empowerment that leads to users taking initiatives of programming albeit temporary, even momentary?
Recent economic conditions and consequences have provided a very interesting opportunity in the form of unoccupied and sometimes unfinished property/spaces. These exist in the context of urban pockets that are also far from full occupancy, but are rich in diverse and active communities.
So here’s the last string of questions; can systematic interventions and projected representations of these spaces provide the basis of a dialogue? Can photos, mappings and wishful scenarios lead to activation? Can action succeed teasing the potentials, flirting with the genius loci? dxbWRK is not an owner, not an occupant, but just a very zoomed out set of community members. City dwellers and vacancy mappers.

A Sequence of Questions: a Response

@sharmeensyed @dxbWRK

What is it that draws us to specific places? It’s a question that is either too obvious or far too vague to take on — in Dubai at least. There is a constant struggle to establish a relationship with our immediate environments, often intertwined with our sense [or lack] of ownership. Is it proximity? Is our sense of community based around the house, workplace, campus? Or is community associative; are we drawn to places that reflect our lifestyles, beliefs, memories and choices?

Here’s the big question: What if the two were the same? We want to investigate the possibility of spaces in geographical communities to reflect the associative programs of the various community members. Can there be a sufficient sense of empowerment that leads to users taking initiatives of programming albeit temporary, even momentary?

Recent economic conditions and consequences have provided a very interesting opportunity in the form of unoccupied and sometimes unfinished property/spaces. These exist in the context of urban pockets that are also far from full occupancy, but are rich in diverse and active communities.

So here’s the last string of questions; can systematic interventions and projected representations of these spaces provide the basis of a dialogue? Can photos, mappings and wishful scenarios lead to activation? Can action succeed teasing the potentials, flirting with the genius loci? dxbWRK is not an owner, not an occupant, but just a very zoomed out set of community members. City dwellers and vacancy mappers.

'make sense of me' shouted the space in my face when i stepped in. plastered walls, concrete blocks, red tubes, a mishmash of stuff. 'i dont feel whole'.

'make sense of me' shouted the space in my face when i stepped in. plastered walls, concrete blocks, red tubes, a mishmash of stuff. 'i dont feel whole'.

JBR Sadaf vacant spaces Oct 2011

community: barsha

spaces: shops 8-12

community: al mazil district, downtown

spaces: yansoon 7, yansoon 8, yansoon 9, al dukkan

Al Manzil District, Al Dukkan

back to downtown

Al Manzil District, Yansoon 7

back to downtown

In an article published in Gulf News, Business | Economy, Kevin Scott lists oversupply in the real estate sector as one of the key issues and challenges facing the local economy in 2012. 

For full article, click here.

In an article published in Gulf News, Business | Economy, Kevin Scott lists oversupply in the real estate sector as one of the key issues and challenges facing the local economy in 2012. 


For full article, click here.

#WhatIf this is an emitter of light? 

this is an emitter of light? 

"There are plans to unveil an online platform early next year called  Citypulse, for residents to learn about and contribute to urban planning  in the capital, said Fouad Kassem, the public affairs and media  relations manager for the UPC."
[Source: The National]

"There are plans to unveil an online platform early next year called Citypulse, for residents to learn about and contribute to urban planning in the capital, said Fouad Kassem, the public affairs and media relations manager for the UPC."

[Source: The National]

[source of fact: Jones Lang LaSalle, Dubai Real Estate Market Overview - Q2 2011]
Incubator, Dubai’s next move by Mishaal Al Gergawi for the Gulf News
“About 15 months ago, Jones Lang LaSalle published a report that    worryingly noted that 33 per cent of Dubai’s 43.6 million square feet of    commercial space was vacant, with an additional 40 million square  feet   (revised down from 60 million square feet) coming on to the  market by   2012.”

[source of fact: Jones Lang LaSalle, Dubai Real Estate Market Overview - Q2 2011]

Incubator, Dubai’s next move by Mishaal Al Gergawi for the Gulf News

“About 15 months ago, Jones Lang LaSalle published a report that worryingly noted that 33 per cent of Dubai’s 43.6 million square feet of commercial space was vacant, with an additional 40 million square feet (revised down from 60 million square feet) coming on to the market by 2012.”

It came across as a space  that could be appropriated for as big or as   small a group as it could  house. Spiritual, celebratory, collective.

It came across as a space that could be appropriated for as big or as small a group as it could house. Spiritual, celebratory, collective.

Making sense of dxbWRK
@jjabri @dxbWRK
you start noticing empty spaces in the city. as an architect you ask ‘why’? why so many empty spaces? the intrigue leads to investigation, and more so, to heightened interest in being in these empty spaces, the haven of a creative mind, a blank slate where possibilities are endless. we’ve been doing this for a couple of months: identifying empty spaces in the city of Dubai. and then we slowed down. do we grow a database of empty spaces? something is missing. again, i walk in Jumeira Beach Residences, in the Sadaf complex this time. the ratio of empty spaces is about 20-30% on the mezzanine commercial level. what if the spaces were not empty? is our aim to fill spaces? not at all. i’d say whether it was a 90 to 10% ratio of empty to occupied spaces or 100% occupied, the question would remain the same: are the occupied spaces maximizing on the community value proposition? is a community existing and flourishing as a result of the existence of these spaces? or are these spaces only contributing to the anonymity nurtured in those large scale, high speed, high turnover residential developments?  we started dxbWRK with a proposition that those empty spaces had the potential to open up to the community, for it to determine its own needs. this proposal works on the fringe of the issue. the issue is economics. how can our value proposition generate an viable economic model that would:     1. bring no financial losses to the real estate developer/space owner    2. bring social interest to the community residing in that development    3. bring no added expenses to the community residing in that development  and what if we came forward with a proposal that not only fulfills the above three criteria, but also acted on a fourth anchor:       4. devise financial benefit/return to the community residing in that development  this is what dxbWRK is about, that last point that makes design thinking merge with community building, and with financial viability and potential benefit to all stakeholders.  i will stop at that knowing that today was a revelation in a direction worth pursuing.

Making sense of dxbWRK

@jjabri @dxbWRK

you start noticing empty spaces in the city. as an architect you ask ‘why’? why so many empty spaces? the intrigue leads to investigation, and more so, to heightened interest in being in these empty spaces, the haven of a creative mind, a blank slate where possibilities are endless. we’ve been doing this for a couple of months: identifying empty spaces in the city of Dubai. and then we slowed down. do we grow a database of empty spaces? something is missing. again, i walk in Jumeira Beach Residences, in the Sadaf complex this time. the ratio of empty spaces is about 20-30% on the mezzanine commercial level. what if the spaces were not empty? is our aim to fill spaces? not at all. i’d say whether it was a 90 to 10% ratio of empty to occupied spaces or 100% occupied, the question would remain the same: are the occupied spaces maximizing on the community value proposition? is a community existing and flourishing as a result of the existence of these spaces? or are these spaces only contributing to the anonymity nurtured in those large scale, high speed, high turnover residential developments? we started dxbWRK with a proposition that those empty spaces had the potential to open up to the community, for it to determine its own needs. this proposal works on the fringe of the issue. the issue is economics. how can our value proposition generate an viable economic model that would: 1. bring no financial losses to the real estate developer/space owner 2. bring social interest to the community residing in that development 3. bring no added expenses to the community residing in that development and what if we came forward with a proposal that not only fulfills the above three criteria, but also acted on a fourth anchor: 4. devise financial benefit/return to the community residing in that development this is what dxbWRK is about, that last point that makes design thinking merge with community building, and with financial viability and potential benefit to all stakeholders. i will stop at that knowing that today was a revelation in a direction worth pursuing.

A Sequence of Questions: a Response
@sharmeensyed @dxbWRK
What is it that draws us to specific places? It’s a question that is either too obvious or far too vague to take on — in Dubai at least. There is a constant struggle to establish a relationship with our immediate environments, often intertwined with our sense [or lack] of ownership. Is it proximity? Is our sense of community based around the house, workplace, campus? Or is community associative; are we drawn to places that reflect our lifestyles, beliefs, memories and choices?
Here’s the big question: What if the two were the same? We want to investigate the possibility of spaces in geographical communities to reflect the associative programs of the various community members. Can there be a sufficient sense of empowerment that leads to users taking initiatives of programming albeit temporary, even momentary?
Recent economic conditions and consequences have provided a very interesting opportunity in the form of unoccupied and sometimes unfinished property/spaces. These exist in the context of urban pockets that are also far from full occupancy, but are rich in diverse and active communities.
So here’s the last string of questions; can systematic interventions and projected representations of these spaces provide the basis of a dialogue? Can photos, mappings and wishful scenarios lead to activation? Can action succeed teasing the potentials, flirting with the genius loci? dxbWRK is not an owner, not an occupant, but just a very zoomed out set of community members. City dwellers and vacancy mappers.

A Sequence of Questions: a Response

@sharmeensyed @dxbWRK

What is it that draws us to specific places? It’s a question that is either too obvious or far too vague to take on — in Dubai at least. There is a constant struggle to establish a relationship with our immediate environments, often intertwined with our sense [or lack] of ownership. Is it proximity? Is our sense of community based around the house, workplace, campus? Or is community associative; are we drawn to places that reflect our lifestyles, beliefs, memories and choices?

Here’s the big question: What if the two were the same? We want to investigate the possibility of spaces in geographical communities to reflect the associative programs of the various community members. Can there be a sufficient sense of empowerment that leads to users taking initiatives of programming albeit temporary, even momentary?

Recent economic conditions and consequences have provided a very interesting opportunity in the form of unoccupied and sometimes unfinished property/spaces. These exist in the context of urban pockets that are also far from full occupancy, but are rich in diverse and active communities.

So here’s the last string of questions; can systematic interventions and projected representations of these spaces provide the basis of a dialogue? Can photos, mappings and wishful scenarios lead to activation? Can action succeed teasing the potentials, flirting with the genius loci? dxbWRK is not an owner, not an occupant, but just a very zoomed out set of community members. City dwellers and vacancy mappers.

'make sense of me' shouted the space in my face when i stepped in. plastered walls, concrete blocks, red tubes, a mishmash of stuff. 'i dont feel whole'.

'make sense of me' shouted the space in my face when i stepped in. plastered walls, concrete blocks, red tubes, a mishmash of stuff. 'i dont feel whole'.

JBR Sadaf vacant spaces Oct 2011

community: barsha

spaces: shops 8-12

community: al mazil district, downtown

spaces: yansoon 7, yansoon 8, yansoon 9, al dukkan

Al Manzil District, Al Dukkan

back to downtown

Al Manzil District, Yansoon 7

back to downtown

About:

dxbWRK is an invitation to contribute productively and proactively to Dubai's urban communities. It is a platform that allows content to be shared towards addressing the potential of the city- physically and socially.

Following: